Smash Gyms NAGA Highlight Video

Congratulations to everyone that competed in NAGA! Smash had a great showing and the competitors brought home lots of medals. It’s amazing to see everyone’s progression. Thanks to Mario RiosManny RochaCrystina Zastrow, and Eli Sanchez for all the help coaching. Awesome day for the competitors and we know a lot of Smashers are looking forward to the US open.

Kids Classes NOW at Smash San Jose!

Beginning Monday (2/10/14) our NEW Comprehensive Kids and Teens martial arts program will begin! We are so excited to launch our new Kids Martial Arts classes at the East San Jose & Evergreen location! Our kids program will feature Kids Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu, Kids Wrestling, and Kids Judo classes taught by World Class Instructors. This comprehensive grappling program will not only prepare your son or daughter for any self-defense situation but will help them gain the discipline and respect to become a winner in their day to day life. If your child chooses to compete in Judo, Wrestling, or BJJ our program and coaches can guide them along a path to becoming an exceptional athlete and role model. Through this program your child will gain the confidence to overcome any obstacle they encounter. We will make your child a winner.

Wrestling, Judo and BJJ for Kids

Program Instructors include:

Filip Novachkov- D1 College Wrestler (Cal Poly), Pac-10 Finalist, California High School State Champion, 3x CA State Placer, 3x CCS Champion

Scott Clymer- NCWA National Champion, D1 College Wrestler at Liberty University, Pennsylvania High School State Wrestling Champion, NCAA Wrestling Championships Competitor, MAC Conference Champion (“Most Valuable Wrestler”)

Eli Sanchez- D1 College Wrestler at Liberty University, San Jose Open Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu Medium Heavy and Absolute Champion, 2011 BJJ by the Sea Champion, US Open Championships 3rd place

Vince Rodriguez– 5th Place High School National Championships 1985, 3rd Place California State Championships 1985, 2x Freestyle State Champion

Jacob Palomino– 4X California State Wrestling Championship Finalist,  2011 BJJ US Open Champion

Sam Spengler– Quimby Oak Junior High School Coach, Pro-MMA Fighter, Montana State Wrestling Champion

Dave Williams- SJSU Judo Instructor, Judo National Champion

Come in and try a FREE WEEK of Classes! 

Kids Judo, Wrestling, BJJ

As of Monday the current kids schedule will be as follows…

Wrestling (Kids and Teens)

4:30pm  from Monday- Thursday

Judo (Kids & Teens)

4:30pm on Tuesday & Thursday

Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu (Kids and Teens)

5:30pm from Monday-Thursday

 

We will also have later Wrestling options for teens and adults at 6:30pm on Tuesday and Thursday. 

Website: smashgyms.com/sanjose

Facebook Fan Page: www.facebook.com/smashsanjose

Smash Gyms San Jose is Now OPEN!!!!

Smash Gyms San Jose Evergreen & East San Jose will begin classes tomorrow February 4th! After dealing with the permitting process since July we were finally cleared to open. Thanks so much for all the help and support from the local community!

Try our first Jiu-Jitsu class Free on Tuesday evening at 7:30pm! We will add programs and classes in the days and weeks after. Please see the link to the schedule below for updates.

Smash Gyms San Jose Schedule

We are amazed by the generous help and support from the Smash Family, the local Wrestling and Jiu-Jitsu community, and our neighbors in Evergreen and East San Jose. We are looking forward to giving back by bringing as much value as possible to individuals and families within the community. 

Please come in and try a free week of training! All classes are beginner friendly!

In the next couple weeks we will begin our other classes including Kickboxing, Yoga, UJAM & Zumba, Strength & Conditioning, MMA Self-Defense and Fitness, Bootcamps, Kids Wrestling & BJJ, Kids tutoring and more! We will have a GRAND OPENING PARTY some time in March!

 

Smash Gyms Evergreen & East San Jose

 

Here is a list of just some of the people that came to help! Thank you for the support!

Curtis and Daniel Summers of BC Electric for their extremely generous donations!

Coach Vince Rodriguez and Michael Rodriguez

Joe Gonzalez

Sam Spengler

Noel Galano

Reza Milani

Michael Villar

Scott Clymer

Hsiaolin Wang

Jerry Brito

Nikki Langendorf

Debbie Sanchez

Eugene Kang

Stephen Novachkov

Refugio Rios

Greg Crane and Ed Crane

Julie Sanchez

Mrs. Rios

Ben Hyatt 

Juan Romo

Carlos Renteria

Jeff Pena

Leo Shen

Halen and Beasten Tanimoto

Sean Carty

Issac and Alex Rios

Tony Boyle

Ivo and Yane Penev

Amethyst May

Luis Lesende

Casara Sanchez

Javier Martinez

Fernando Alarcon

James Basurto

 

Thanks especially to all the awesome instructors and students and at our Sunnyvale location! Thanks to everyone that helped make Smash Gyms San Jose possible!

BJJ students compete at the 6th Annual American Cup

Great effort by our Brazilian Jiu-jitsu students who competed in the 2013 American Cup BJJ Tournament over the weekend.  Our competitors put on a great display of skill and heart.  At the conclusion of the tournament, Ben Hyatt, Tom Lopez, Javier Martinez and, Sam Spenglar placed 1st in their respective divisions.  Leo Shen placed 2nd and Eli Sanchez, Juan Romo, and Patrick Kong placed 3rd in their divisions.  Congratulations to everyone!

Check out the highlights!  To watch in HD, change the quality setting on the player when the video begins.  Enjoy!

Jiu-Jitsu – Sport vs Martial Arts

“Our BJJ competitors have been extremely successful in competition in the short time that Smash Gyms has been opened. We consistently have had numerous people win or medal at every competition we have entered. What have I learned from our competition success? It does not reflect one’s entire knowledge or skill in the art, but rather who can play this “game”. While winning is great, competition is only very small part of the entire art of BJJ. 

The rules of competition have changed over the years. This basically means a person or small group of people have begun to change the definition of what BJJ should look and be like. In my opinion, if one is true to the art and has integrity, they will stick to what they believe the art should be rather than change their views based on what a small committee decided.

My students will continue to go out on the competition floor and have fun. But for me, I judge my students by what I see on the mat every class they attend, year after year, not from 5 or 6 min. at some event.” – Michael Jen, 3rd Degree Jiu-Jitsu Black Belt 

 

Most people begin taking Brazilian Jiu-jitsu as a martial art. This was especially true in the past when Sport BJJ tournaments were much more rare in the US. Many people who began training with the Gracie family in the early 90’s did not even know that BJJ Sport tournaments existed in Brazil. As more Brazilians moved to the US and more people reached Black Belt level it was natural for the sport jiu-jitsu to grow in the US as well. Sport BJJ is fun and many BJJ practitioners are competitive.  Plus, the nature of the art is a that of a “show me” mentality. In BJJ you are able apply your skills with 100% live resistance and no one gets hurt. We do it in our training rooms together so it makes sense to have events where people from different schools can test their skills.

Jiu-jitsu was originally designed to be effective in a fight. BJJ evolved from a Japanese prize fighting teaching Kano Jiu-Jitsu to Brazilians. The art continued to progress and evolve until the Gracie family showcased the art in the original UFC’s as the best martial in the world for a one-on-one fight. The UFC started as a infomercial to show the effectiveness of BJJ against other styles. Before the UFC: the Gracie family used “Gracie in Action” videos showing hundreds of victories in their bare-nuckle no rules challenge matches against other martial artists. This campaign from the Gracie family left little doubt that BJJ was an incredibly effective martial art.

Jiu-jitsu has split into two very different directions: Sport vs. Martial Art. Some of the most effective techniques commonly used in today’s sport BJJ would be ridiculous to try in a fight. Many very effective grappling techniques are no longer allowed in sport BJJ. Jiu-jitsu for fighting has changed to Jiu-jitsu for grappling.

High level sport BJJ has turned into a beautiful display of grappling that no one could have imagined. It has turned into a legitimate sport and is growing rapidly. The popularity is partly because it offers a unique option for anyone to compete against people who are the same age, same belt and same weight as themselves! This has turned hobbyist into competitors. People who like to compete in individual sports can continue to do so in a level playing field far passed high school or college. Sport BJJ has created communities , friendships and families within teams. This is a beautiful thing.

Other arts have followed this path and often the sport flourishes and the art dies. Many other martial arts have become great sports but lost much along the way. As more rules are introduced, the less effective the sport is as a martial art. Most top sport BJJ practitioners would still be very effective in a one on one fight against an untrained and unarmed attacker. New BJJ practitioners trying to mimic sport jiu-jitsu technique in a real fight could get hurt.

If you look at the evolution of BJJ vs Judo one can argue that same art changed radically under different conditions. The Gracie family learned the same art that was practiced in Japan in the early 1900’s. In Brazil very few rules were added and the environment supported creativity and innovation. Meanwhile in Japan traditions and rules took the sport in an entirely different direction. These rules helped the sport of Judo grow all the way to the Olympic games. But the rules obviously hurt the effectiveness as a martial art. Meanwhile in Brazil practitioners were not forced to stand straight up, they did not add time limits for ground work, or rounds. The absence of rules made the art much more effective in a fight and led to BJJ. The addition of rules made the art of Judo much less effective in a fight but lead to it becoming an Olympic Sport.

This of course is not to say Judo guys can’t fight. Top Judoks are some of the toughest guys to walk the Earth. Same thing with collegiate or olympic wrestlers, boxers and who ever else practices full force sparring. As a martial art though you would have to be terribly biased to think the sports of wrestling or judo match up with BJJ as a stand alone martial art for the average person.

At Smash we believe that it is important for students that attend our Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu classes to remember that Jiu-jitsu is a martial art first. Royce Gracie didn’t pull guard in the first UFC. Royce took people down, punched them then submitted his opponents. We give our students the ability to do this first.

At Smash we teach a very definitive system of Jiu-jitsu. Our core system consists of carefully chosen techniques and systems designed to be effective in MMA, Sport BJJ and a one-on-one self defense situations. Once our students are proficient in the core system then they will be taught supplemental techniques based on their goals.

Is the Sport BJJ good for the Jiu-jitsu as a martial art? Yes! The sport definitely helps raise awareness of BJJ. It helps teams and schools with retention and team camaraderie. In the end every practitioner needs to decide why they train and find a school and instructor that fits their goals.