Smash Gyms Blog
15Dec/110

2011 Was an Amazing Year for the Smash Gyms BJJ Program! Watch out 2012!

 

2011 was an amazing year for all the programs at Smash. I'd like to take a moment and point out the amazing growth of our BJJ program in particular.

The Smash Gyms Jiu-jitsu program is headed by Michael Jen. Michael had been teaching a small group of loyal students out of his garage for nearly 10 years. Most of his students grappled recreationally for exercise, fun and self-defense. He did have one student that liked to compete in Sport BJJ. Seo Perales was only the second person ever to be promoted to Black Belt by Michael. Seo took 3rd and 5th in the World Championships and won his division in the US Open twice. Michael's students were all complimented on their solid fundamentals when training at other schools and Seo's success was impressive but still Michael was largely unknown in the younger Sport Jiu-Jitsu world. Michael was one of the first 50 American BJJ Blackbelts but only the "old school" guys knew who he was since he had been not publicly teaching for ten years.

The Smash Gyms Jiu jitsu program officially started in January 2011. We were excited and happy to share the system of BJJ that we had spent 10 years in Michael's garage helping to design. The system went through many iterations where techniques were changed, thrown out, and replaced. We were confident that we now had a system of teaching BJJ that would help the average person turn into a very good grappler in a short amount of time. We also knew it would help a talented person turn into a monster even faster.

Many of Michael's top students came and helped lead the new program at Smash. Seo moved to the Bay Area for a few months to help get the program started. Mario Rios a brown belt, was in almost every class teaching the system of jiu-jitsu to beginners. Louie Noble and Andrew Yao purples and all of our blue belts were happy to help everyone. Before opening Smash we were fortunate to have relationships with talented people and training partners with a variety of skill-sets and backgrounds. They all came to help. My younger brother Eli who was a D1 College wrestler came in and combined his wrestling with our BJJ and made some noise. Pretty soon we had state champions like Jacob Palomino, all-american wrestlers and Judokas like Patrick Kong and pro-fighters like Sam Spengler all join the team to train, learn and pass on their existing skills to the students at Smash.

With such a great group of talented and giving instructors our brand new Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu program literally shocked the Sport BJJ world in 2011. The very first team tournament the Smash competitors attended they brought home 3 Gold Medals. Sam, Seo, and Patrick dominated their divisions at BJJ by the Bay. After a few months the influx of new and motivated faces found Smash to be a place where they could learn and excel. Guys like David, Sam Jung, Rogelio, Joe, Harry and Ruben joined and helped rally the team. A couple months later was BJJ by the Sea and we brought home 7 medals. 4 gold and 3 silver. Exceptional growth but it did not stop there. In July Smash brought a team to the San Jose Open and won it. The Smash Gyms competitors brought home 8 Gold medals, 2 silver, 2 bronze and the Team Trophy. It was phenomenal feeling to have such remarkable success as a new gym in the Bay Area, which is known worldwide to be a BJJ Mecca of top schools. How would we do at a national level tournament though? We found out at the US Open 2011. Smash Gyms had 6 people place in the top 3 at this nationally recognized tournament. This is unheard of for a brand new school.

We are incredibly proud of each and every person on our team. Even more fulfilling than tournament wins is watching someone go from "the nail" to "the hammer" during a practice. 2011 was amazing because of everyone that stepped on the mat and tried to help each other get better. There are too many people to thank in this post but I can honestly say I've learned from every single one of the students at Smash. Thanks to everyone that has helped us with the struggle to improve ourselves both on and off the mat. With everyone's help 2012 will be even more amazing.

22Oct/110

Jiu-Jitsu – Sport vs Martial Arts

"Our BJJ competitors have been extremely successful in competition in the short time that Smash Gyms has been opened. We consistently have had numerous people win or medal at every competition we have entered. What have I learned from our competition success? It does not reflect one's entire knowledge or skill in the art, but rather who can play this "game". While winning is great, competition is only very small part of the entire art of BJJ. 

The rules of competition have changed over the years. This basically means a person or small group of people have begun to change the definition of what BJJ should look and be like. In my opinion, if one is true to the art and has integrity, they will stick to what they believe the art should be rather than change their views based on what a small committee decided.

My students will continue to go out on the competition floor and have fun. But for me, I judge my students by what I see on the mat every class they attend, year after year, not from 5 or 6 min. at some event." - Michael Jen, 3rd Degree Jiu-Jitsu Black Belt 

 

Most people begin taking Brazilian Jiu-jitsu as a martial art. This was especially true in the past when Sport BJJ tournaments were much more rare in the US. Many people who began training with the Gracie family in the early 90's did not even know that BJJ Sport tournaments existed in Brazil. As more Brazilians moved to the US and more people reached Black Belt level it was natural for the sport jiu-jitsu to grow in the US as well. Sport BJJ is fun and many BJJ practitioners are competitive.  Plus, the nature of the art is a that of a "show me" mentality. In BJJ you are able apply your skills with 100% live resistance and no one gets hurt. We do it in our training rooms together so it makes sense to have events where people from different schools can test their skills.

Jiu-jitsu was originally designed to be effective in a fight. BJJ evolved from a Japanese prize fighting teaching Kano Jiu-Jitsu to Brazilians. The art continued to progress and evolve until the Gracie family showcased the art in the original UFC's as the best martial in the world for a one-on-one fight. The UFC started as a infomercial to show the effectiveness of BJJ against other styles. Before the UFC: the Gracie family used "Gracie in Action" videos showing hundreds of victories in their bare-nuckle no rules challenge matches against other martial artists. This campaign from the Gracie family left little doubt that BJJ was an incredibly effective martial art.

Jiu-jitsu has split into two very different directions: Sport vs. Martial Art. Some of the most effective techniques commonly used in today's sport BJJ would be ridiculous to try in a fight. Many very effective grappling techniques are no longer allowed in sport BJJ. Jiu-jitsu for fighting has changed to Jiu-jitsu for grappling.

High level sport BJJ has turned into a beautiful display of grappling that no one could have imagined. It has turned into a legitimate sport and is growing rapidly. The popularity is partly because it offers a unique option for anyone to compete against people who are the same age, same belt and same weight as themselves! This has turned hobbyist into competitors. People who like to compete in individual sports can continue to do so in a level playing field far passed high school or college. Sport BJJ has created communities , friendships and families within teams. This is a beautiful thing.

Other arts have followed this path and often the sport flourishes and the art dies. Many other martial arts have become great sports but lost much along the way. As more rules are introduced, the less effective the sport is as a martial art. Most top sport BJJ practitioners would still be very effective in a one on one fight against an untrained and unarmed attacker. New BJJ practitioners trying to mimic sport jiu-jitsu technique in a real fight could get hurt.

If you look at the evolution of BJJ vs Judo one can argue that same art changed radically under different conditions. The Gracie family learned the same art that was practiced in Japan in the early 1900's. In Brazil very few rules were added and the environment supported creativity and innovation. Meanwhile in Japan traditions and rules took the sport in an entirely different direction. These rules helped the sport of Judo grow all the way to the Olympic games. But the rules obviously hurt the effectiveness as a martial art. Meanwhile in Brazil practitioners were not forced to stand straight up, they did not add time limits for ground work, or rounds. The absence of rules made the art much more effective in a fight and led to BJJ. The addition of rules made the art of Judo much less effective in a fight but lead to it becoming an Olympic Sport.

This of course is not to say Judo guys can't fight. Top Judoks are some of the toughest guys to walk the Earth. Same thing with collegiate or olympic wrestlers, boxers and who ever else practices full force sparring. As a martial art though you would have to be terribly biased to think the sports of wrestling or judo match up with BJJ as a stand alone martial art for the average person.

At Smash we believe that it is important for students that attend our Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu classes to remember that Jiu-jitsu is a martial art first. Royce Gracie didn't pull guard in the first UFC. Royce took people down, punched them then submitted his opponents. We give our students the ability to do this first.

At Smash we teach a very definitive system of Jiu-jitsu. Our core system consists of carefully chosen techniques and systems designed to be effective in MMA, Sport BJJ and a one-on-one self defense situations. Once our students are proficient in the core system then they will be taught supplemental techniques based on their goals.

Is the Sport BJJ good for the Jiu-jitsu as a martial art? Yes! The sport definitely helps raise awareness of BJJ. It helps teams and schools with retention and team camaraderie. In the end every practitioner needs to decide why they train and find a school and instructor that fits their goals.

 

10Aug/110

Best Kettlebell Training in Santa Clara, San Jose, Sunnyvale, Milpitas

Our Head Kettlebell Instrcutor Denis Kanygin explains proper technique of the under squat.

 

10Aug/110

Smash Gyms Kids Martial Arts Program – Santa Clara, San Jose, Sunnyvale

Smash Gyms Kids Martial Arts and Fitness

The Smash Gyms Kids Martial Arts Program can and WILL help your child increase their confidence, self-esteem, discipline, while teaching them life skills that will last them a lifetime! In our program your child will be able to progress at their very own pace. We understand that everyone learns differently. Whether your child can only train once a week or everyday we have the program that will fit your needs.

With a strong focus on coordination and overall fitness our kids curriculum includes a systematic blend of Jiu-jitsu, Wrestling, and Judo into a complete grappling system. Our kids class curriculum was designed by Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu black belts, Judo black belts, College Wrestlers, and self-defense experts. Our system is designed as a path for the average child to progress safely and quickly. The system has proven to be highly effective in both self-defense and Brazilian Jiu-jitsu sport competition. You will find our unique classes are presented in a format highly conducive to learning while maintaining a strong focus on safety.

 

20Apr/110

Free Introduction to Kettlebells Seminar in Sunnyvale and Santa Clara

On Saturday January 14th, 2012 Kettlebell Expert Denis Kanygin will be giving a free introductory course to Kettlebell Training at Smash Gyms in Sunnyvale. The hour long beginner seminar is for those unfamiliar with kettlebell training. It will begin at 2:00pm.

Kettlebells have been popular in Russia for a long time, but have become very popular in the U.S. recently due to the intense and productive workouts you can get while using kettlebells.

One of the unique benefits of kettlebells is the improvements to both cardiovascular and anabolic systems. Kettlebell users also have tremendous gains in overall functional strength. Simply put you can increase your overall fitness and tone up your muscles with kettlebells if used correctly.

Denis will cover a variety of topics including basic lifts and techniques. He will also highlight the differences between Kettlebell workouts that for cardio and those designed to build muscle.

All Kettlebell beginners are welcomed to attend the Free Kettlebell Seminar!

Denis Kanygin teaches Kettlebells Classes 5 day a week at Smash Gyms in Sunnyvale.

For more information about Denis Kanygin please visit his site at http://www.kettlebellsystema.com.

Free Introduction to Kettlebells Seminar

Link: http://kettlbells.smashgyms.com/lp/29

When: January 14th, 2012

Where:

Smash Gyms

1239 Reamwood Ave

Sunnyvale, CA 94089

www.SmashGyms.com

408-744-6334

Instructor:

Denis Kanygin is one of the top authorities on Kettlebell training in the United States. Denis teaches his system of kettlebell training full time to athletes, personal trainers, and anyone interested in learning proper technique. Denis is the founder of Kettlebell Systema and is the Head Kettlebell Instructor at Smash Gyms. Denis, a native of Russia, has been training with Kettlebells for over 20 years.

 

 

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